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Fairfield House Goshen Guide Book

Sonya Maree
Sonya Maree
Členem od 2016
Sonya Maree

Fairfield House Goshen Guide Book

Neighbourhood
LEGENDARY TRAILS, WORLD-CLASS ADVENTURES Once a thriving mining town with the richest tin mine in the world and one of the last remaining wilderness areas, Derby is now home to one of the world's premier mountain bike networks located right here in Tasmania. Encompassing 125km of purpose built mountain bike trails with options to suit all skill levels. Where is this? About a 40 minute Drive West on the Tasman Hwy from Fairfield House, Goshen
Derby
LEGENDARY TRAILS, WORLD-CLASS ADVENTURES Once a thriving mining town with the richest tin mine in the world and one of the last remaining wilderness areas, Derby is now home to one of the world's premier mountain bike networks located right here in Tasmania. Encompassing 125km of purpose built mountain bike trails with options to suit all skill levels. Where is this? About a 40 minute Drive West on the Tasman Hwy from Fairfield House, Goshen
ST HELENS St Helens is the largest town on Tasmania's north-east coast and just a few kilometres away from Binalong Bay and the southern end of the beautiful beaches of the Bay of Fires, one of Lonely Planet's top 10 regions in the world. Overlooking beautiful Georges Bay, chartered fishing boats cruise offshore for marlin and divers cruise beneath the surface to explore impressive kelp forests, underwater caves and colourful sea life. St Helen's is the state's second largest fishing port, renowned for its catches of deep sea fish and lobster and a popular destination for recreational fishing. Its waters abound with game fish such as albacore tuna and yellowfin Tuna, and the town is known as the game fishing capital of Tasmania. On land, the 1-hr return walk to St Helens Point takes in the spectacular Peron Dunes and vast ocean beaches that attract surfers and beach lovers alike. St Helens offers all the services of a busy town with a positively laid back vibe, and that's just the way the locals and visitors like it. There's no shortage of eateries and shops to hang out in and people watching is a favourite local pastime. St Helens is also close to the perfect white sandy beaches, lichen-covered granite boulders and crystal clear waters of Binalong Bay and the Bay of Fires. And with all that fishing going on around town, there's no shortage of amazing fresh seafood to sample at the local eateries or a local fishing punt. All types of accommodation can be found in and around St Helens, most with beautiful sea views. St Helens is a 2-hr drive (163 km) east of Launceston. St Helens is a 15 km drive from Fairfield House, Goshen
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St Helens
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ST HELENS St Helens is the largest town on Tasmania's north-east coast and just a few kilometres away from Binalong Bay and the southern end of the beautiful beaches of the Bay of Fires, one of Lonely Planet's top 10 regions in the world. Overlooking beautiful Georges Bay, chartered fishing boats cruise offshore for marlin and divers cruise beneath the surface to explore impressive kelp forests, underwater caves and colourful sea life. St Helen's is the state's second largest fishing port, renowned for its catches of deep sea fish and lobster and a popular destination for recreational fishing. Its waters abound with game fish such as albacore tuna and yellowfin Tuna, and the town is known as the game fishing capital of Tasmania. On land, the 1-hr return walk to St Helens Point takes in the spectacular Peron Dunes and vast ocean beaches that attract surfers and beach lovers alike. St Helens offers all the services of a busy town with a positively laid back vibe, and that's just the way the locals and visitors like it. There's no shortage of eateries and shops to hang out in and people watching is a favourite local pastime. St Helens is also close to the perfect white sandy beaches, lichen-covered granite boulders and crystal clear waters of Binalong Bay and the Bay of Fires. And with all that fishing going on around town, there's no shortage of amazing fresh seafood to sample at the local eateries or a local fishing punt. All types of accommodation can be found in and around St Helens, most with beautiful sea views. St Helens is a 2-hr drive (163 km) east of Launceston. St Helens is a 15 km drive from Fairfield House, Goshen
Binalong Bay is a small coastal town in north-east Tasmania, situated at the southern end of the Bay of Fires. Originally a fishing hamlet, the town is now a village with a large proportion of holiday dwellings. It has spectacular beaches, small harbour and a cafe. A must see. Very busy in the summer months. 27 km East of Fairfield House Goshen 12 km North of St Helens
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Binalong Bay
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Binalong Bay is a small coastal town in north-east Tasmania, situated at the southern end of the Bay of Fires. Originally a fishing hamlet, the town is now a village with a large proportion of holiday dwellings. It has spectacular beaches, small harbour and a cafe. A must see. Very busy in the summer months. 27 km East of Fairfield House Goshen 12 km North of St Helens
Food scene
HOME OF AUSTRALIA’S HERITAGE FARMHOUSE CHEESE Pyengana Dairy, home of Australia’s heritage farmhouse cheese, continuing 130 years of tradition producing handcrafted cheese and dairy products on farm in the Pyengana Valley. REAL HERITAGE, REAL FLAVOUR, REAL MILK VISIT US EAT / DRINK / TASTE / SHOP See our cheese makers in action. Taste the cheeses and discover your favourites. Relax with a gourmet platter overlooking the picturesque dairy farm. Opening Hours We are open 5 days a week Thursday – Monday 10am - 4pm Tuesday & Wednesday - Closed Tasmanian School Holidays We are open 7 days a Week 10am - 4pm Christmas Day – Closed WE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU SOON PYENGANA DAIRY FARM GATE CAFE St Columbus Falls Road Pyengana TAS 7216 (03) 6373 6157 12 km West of Fairfield House Goshen
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Pyengana Dairy Farm Gate Cafe
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HOME OF AUSTRALIA’S HERITAGE FARMHOUSE CHEESE Pyengana Dairy, home of Australia’s heritage farmhouse cheese, continuing 130 years of tradition producing handcrafted cheese and dairy products on farm in the Pyengana Valley. REAL HERITAGE, REAL FLAVOUR, REAL MILK VISIT US EAT / DRINK / TASTE / SHOP See our cheese makers in action. Taste the cheeses and discover your favourites. Relax with a gourmet platter overlooking the picturesque dairy farm. Opening Hours We are open 5 days a week Thursday – Monday 10am - 4pm Tuesday & Wednesday - Closed Tasmanian School Holidays We are open 7 days a Week 10am - 4pm Christmas Day – Closed WE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU SOON PYENGANA DAIRY FARM GATE CAFE St Columbus Falls Road Pyengana TAS 7216 (03) 6373 6157 12 km West of Fairfield House Goshen
French | Modern Australian Cuisines Tuesday - Saturday | Dinner Lunch by appointment only | Closed on Public Holidays Booking is essential Bringing good food and wines to our friends and families 2 Tasman Highway, St. Helens TAS 7216 ​ Tel: +61 3 6376 2151 Email: info@furneauxrestaurant.com.au ​Open for Dinner Tuesday - Saturday, from 6pm.
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Furneaux Restaurant & Comptoir
2 Tasman Hwy
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French | Modern Australian Cuisines Tuesday - Saturday | Dinner Lunch by appointment only | Closed on Public Holidays Booking is essential Bringing good food and wines to our friends and families 2 Tasman Highway, St. Helens TAS 7216 ​ Tel: +61 3 6376 2151 Email: info@furneauxrestaurant.com.au ​Open for Dinner Tuesday - Saturday, from 6pm.
Fresh Tasmanian Produce Visit us for lunch or dinner and enjoy delicious local steaks, seafood and homemade burgers. Or, sample our oysters and sip champagne in our elegant dining area. Whatever you prefer, come and enjoy the authentic vibe and delicious meals prepared fresh daily at our tavern. We are committed to the health and safety of our patrons. As such all precautions and Government restrictions relating to COVID-19 will apply. Book a table to enjoy a classic meal. Just call us on 03 6321 9108 Address : 1 Marina Pde St Helens, TAS 7216 Contact Us : 03 6321 9108 enquiries.thewharf@gmail.com
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The Wharf Bar & Kitchen
1 Marina Parade
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Fresh Tasmanian Produce Visit us for lunch or dinner and enjoy delicious local steaks, seafood and homemade burgers. Or, sample our oysters and sip champagne in our elegant dining area. Whatever you prefer, come and enjoy the authentic vibe and delicious meals prepared fresh daily at our tavern. We are committed to the health and safety of our patrons. As such all precautions and Government restrictions relating to COVID-19 will apply. Book a table to enjoy a classic meal. Just call us on 03 6321 9108 Address : 1 Marina Pde St Helens, TAS 7216 Contact Us : 03 6321 9108 enquiries.thewharf@gmail.com
Sightseeing
What some travellers are saying on trip advisor... It’s 1 hour 40 minutes drive from Launceston and just 120kms you will love the scenic view on the way as well. This is a truly magical wonder of nature. WOW What an amazing place to stop and take photos. The is so true to the photos. Great tourism attraction A great pit stop when travelling around the north of Tasmania A beautiful lake that is definitely worth detouring to visit. We visited the Little Blue Lake on our way from Launceston to Binelong Bay. We only stayed 20min or so to have a look and take photos as the area is quite remote and there was not really anything else to see around it. Be aware that there is no internet coverage out in this area, which meant I couldn't get Google maps to work. This resulted in us ending up on a dirt road, travelling to Binalong (which was ok, but not the way we had planned to go). Amazing colour! The blue colour is amazing to see. Colour is due to white clay ground that remains after mining. Can’t swim in this water. We were there in a beautifully clear summers day. Kids loved it! Lil blue Nice detour to see this pretty little lake, but probably not worth making a special trip. Dont get me wrong, it is beautiful and the colour is as you see in the photos, but there are no walking tracks around it and definitely no swimming as it is extremely acidic.
Little Blue Lake
1573 Gladstone Rd
What some travellers are saying on trip advisor... It’s 1 hour 40 minutes drive from Launceston and just 120kms you will love the scenic view on the way as well. This is a truly magical wonder of nature. WOW What an amazing place to stop and take photos. The is so true to the photos. Great tourism attraction A great pit stop when travelling around the north of Tasmania A beautiful lake that is definitely worth detouring to visit. We visited the Little Blue Lake on our way from Launceston to Binelong Bay. We only stayed 20min or so to have a look and take photos as the area is quite remote and there was not really anything else to see around it. Be aware that there is no internet coverage out in this area, which meant I couldn't get Google maps to work. This resulted in us ending up on a dirt road, travelling to Binalong (which was ok, but not the way we had planned to go). Amazing colour! The blue colour is amazing to see. Colour is due to white clay ground that remains after mining. Can’t swim in this water. We were there in a beautifully clear summers day. Kids loved it! Lil blue Nice detour to see this pretty little lake, but probably not worth making a special trip. Dont get me wrong, it is beautiful and the colour is as you see in the photos, but there are no walking tracks around it and definitely no swimming as it is extremely acidic.
A 15 minute drive from Fairfield House Goshen then about a 30 minute walk from the carpark to experience these gorgeous falls. This short forest-to-waterfall walk is both rich in history and infused with the tranquility of moving water. Halls Falls lies on the Groom River and drops from a hand-made, nineteenth century weir located upstream from the waterfall. The weir remains from a time when Chinese miners worked the region’s rich, mineral veins for tin. During the 1880s, tin was used widely for household utensils, including pots, pans, candleholders, oil lamps, and lanterns. Preserving food in cans, first invented in the Napoleonic Wars, was initially a status symbol among civilians but became increasingly popular through the nineteenth century. This mainly flat track passes above and below Halls Falls and its charming rock pools, presenting many excellent photo opportunities. The walk is steep only in the brief descent to the base of the Falls. Above the falls, the track branches off to a number of sites via sidetracks along the Groom River and through the nearby forest. Immense tree stumps remain as a reminder of tall trees felled over a century ago by early settlers. You will find a special excerpt from a poem by Australian poet, Peter Hay, on the interpretation panel at the head of this track. Check out this link for more information. https://www.et.org.au/halls_falls We also offer guided photography tours for those of our guests that book and let us know in advance. Follow & Book us on Instagram. www.instagram.com/tasmaniaphotographytours
Halls Falls
49 Anchor Rd
A 15 minute drive from Fairfield House Goshen then about a 30 minute walk from the carpark to experience these gorgeous falls. This short forest-to-waterfall walk is both rich in history and infused with the tranquility of moving water. Halls Falls lies on the Groom River and drops from a hand-made, nineteenth century weir located upstream from the waterfall. The weir remains from a time when Chinese miners worked the region’s rich, mineral veins for tin. During the 1880s, tin was used widely for household utensils, including pots, pans, candleholders, oil lamps, and lanterns. Preserving food in cans, first invented in the Napoleonic Wars, was initially a status symbol among civilians but became increasingly popular through the nineteenth century. This mainly flat track passes above and below Halls Falls and its charming rock pools, presenting many excellent photo opportunities. The walk is steep only in the brief descent to the base of the Falls. Above the falls, the track branches off to a number of sites via sidetracks along the Groom River and through the nearby forest. Immense tree stumps remain as a reminder of tall trees felled over a century ago by early settlers. You will find a special excerpt from a poem by Australian poet, Peter Hay, on the interpretation panel at the head of this track. Check out this link for more information. https://www.et.org.au/halls_falls We also offer guided photography tours for those of our guests that book and let us know in advance. Follow & Book us on Instagram. www.instagram.com/tasmaniaphotographytours
A scenic 20 minute drive from Fairfield House heading towards Pyengana and then a gorgeous 15 minute walk to the falls with little side tracks to the river. St. Columba Falls is one of Tasmania's tallest waterfalls, with a waterfall drop of over 90 metres. Situated approximately 30km's west of St. Helens, with easy access from the A3 Highway, with a turn off to Pyengana, St. Columba Falls is one of Tasmania's favourite waterfalls to visit St. Columba Falls is part of the St Columba Falls State Reserve, featuring a picnic and toilet facilities, with somewhat limited parking along the road. The track from the carpark to the falls is well maintained, but is a steady climb back from the base of the falls to the carpark. * George and Margaret Cotton settled here in 1875 with their 9 children, naming their property St Columba after a Gaelic Irish missionary monk who preached Christianity among the Picts. Follow the link for more detailed information. https://parks.tas.gov.au/explore-our-parks/st-columba-falls-state-reserve/st-columba-falls We also offer guided photography tours so let us know so we can book you in. You can follow us on Insta for more pictures of gorgeous North East Tasmania. www.instagram.com/tasmaniaphotographytours
Saint Columba Falls Track
A scenic 20 minute drive from Fairfield House heading towards Pyengana and then a gorgeous 15 minute walk to the falls with little side tracks to the river. St. Columba Falls is one of Tasmania's tallest waterfalls, with a waterfall drop of over 90 metres. Situated approximately 30km's west of St. Helens, with easy access from the A3 Highway, with a turn off to Pyengana, St. Columba Falls is one of Tasmania's favourite waterfalls to visit St. Columba Falls is part of the St Columba Falls State Reserve, featuring a picnic and toilet facilities, with somewhat limited parking along the road. The track from the carpark to the falls is well maintained, but is a steady climb back from the base of the falls to the carpark. * George and Margaret Cotton settled here in 1875 with their 9 children, naming their property St Columba after a Gaelic Irish missionary monk who preached Christianity among the Picts. Follow the link for more detailed information. https://parks.tas.gov.au/explore-our-parks/st-columba-falls-state-reserve/st-columba-falls We also offer guided photography tours so let us know so we can book you in. You can follow us on Insta for more pictures of gorgeous North East Tasmania. www.instagram.com/tasmaniaphotographytours
BAY OF FIRES CONSERVATION RESERVE - EAST COAST is a 25 minute scenic drive from Fairfield House Goshen heading towards St Helens on the East Coast. You could easily spend a whole day here. Famous for its crystal-clear waters, white sandy beaches and orange lichen-covered granite boulders, the Bay of Fires is one of Tasmania's most popular conservation reserves. The Bay of Fires conservation area extends along the coast from Binalong Bay in the south to Eddystone Point in the north. Its name refers to the Aboriginal fires spotted by Captain Tobias Furneaux when he sailed past in 1773, but it could also apply to the brilliant orange lichen that grows on the granite boulders lining the bay. There is still evidence of the lives of the first Tasmanian along the coastline, in the form of middens (shell and bone dumping grounds). The conservation area is divided into three sections, with Anson's Bay dividing the southern and northern ends. A scenic view of the bay can be glimpsed by driving along the coast to The Gardens. The Bay of Fires area contains rocky gullies, with many small secluded beaches and inlets to explore. Binalong Bay is the area's main beach – a beautiful stretch of white sand and clear water for swimming, snorkelling, surfing or simply relaxing. There's a wealth of local wildlife to discover, too, including birds that can be encountered on self-guided and guided walks. The area is renowned for game fishing, with numerous boat ramps. The offshore reefs contain rich marine biodiversity that attracts divers and snorkelers. Campsites are located in the southern and middle sections of the conservation area, with toilet facilities in the southern beach sites. Camping is not allowed in the northern section, but there are campsites at Deep Creek, just outside the conservation area in the adjoining Mount William National Park. Other accommodation is available in and around Binalong Bay, including remote eco-lodges. The coastal town of St Helens is located at the southern entrance to the conservation area and offers more places to stay, plus services and facilities. Definately a photographers paradise. You can do a self guided tour or book in one of our guided photography tours. You can find us on instagram at @photographytourstasmania or https://www.instagram.com/tasmaniaphotographytours
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Bay of Fires Conservation Area
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BAY OF FIRES CONSERVATION RESERVE - EAST COAST is a 25 minute scenic drive from Fairfield House Goshen heading towards St Helens on the East Coast. You could easily spend a whole day here. Famous for its crystal-clear waters, white sandy beaches and orange lichen-covered granite boulders, the Bay of Fires is one of Tasmania's most popular conservation reserves. The Bay of Fires conservation area extends along the coast from Binalong Bay in the south to Eddystone Point in the north. Its name refers to the Aboriginal fires spotted by Captain Tobias Furneaux when he sailed past in 1773, but it could also apply to the brilliant orange lichen that grows on the granite boulders lining the bay. There is still evidence of the lives of the first Tasmanian along the coastline, in the form of middens (shell and bone dumping grounds). The conservation area is divided into three sections, with Anson's Bay dividing the southern and northern ends. A scenic view of the bay can be glimpsed by driving along the coast to The Gardens. The Bay of Fires area contains rocky gullies, with many small secluded beaches and inlets to explore. Binalong Bay is the area's main beach – a beautiful stretch of white sand and clear water for swimming, snorkelling, surfing or simply relaxing. There's a wealth of local wildlife to discover, too, including birds that can be encountered on self-guided and guided walks. The area is renowned for game fishing, with numerous boat ramps. The offshore reefs contain rich marine biodiversity that attracts divers and snorkelers. Campsites are located in the southern and middle sections of the conservation area, with toilet facilities in the southern beach sites. Camping is not allowed in the northern section, but there are campsites at Deep Creek, just outside the conservation area in the adjoining Mount William National Park. Other accommodation is available in and around Binalong Bay, including remote eco-lodges. The coastal town of St Helens is located at the southern entrance to the conservation area and offers more places to stay, plus services and facilities. Definately a photographers paradise. You can do a self guided tour or book in one of our guided photography tours. You can find us on instagram at @photographytourstasmania or https://www.instagram.com/tasmaniaphotographytours
This is what Mee Maw B from Brisbane Region, Australia had to say. She was travelling from Launcestion heading to St Helens way. Such a surprise and sooooo unusual This place is so surprising. The turnoff is on the road between Branxholm and Weldborough (less than the half way mark from Branxholm) and then there's a 13km gravel road which is fine for 2WD. You then walk about 100m to the dam wall and OMG it's like something prehistoric. You come upon this huge wall with "doorways" in it. One of them has been knocked through and you can peer through into another world of rocks and ferns. The wall is a discontinued dam and when you walk through you enter another world. It's a photographer's dream and I just couldn't get enough. This is absolutely a must see! Malcolm H from Launceston, Australia had this to say A great piece of history Great piece of local history and a great feat of workmanship . Photographers delight. Travelling east just outside Branxholm take the signposted turn to Mt Paris Dam - 13km . Reset your trip meter to 0 at this point . At almost exactly 13 km there will be a reasonably well used track running downhill to your left . This is the turn - someone has stolen the sign ! If your car is low to the ground walk from here its only about 150 m . Well worth the look . You can continue on the same road through to Welborough and the Tasman Highway ; another 6km. Here at Fairfield house we love this place. My nans brothers helped build the dam and my father used to play on it and even swim in the dam many years ago. Love taking my guest for photograpy tours here and then having a gorgeous lunch at the Weldbourgh Hotel before heading towards Columba Falls, Halls Falls, Big Tree and Blue Teir then calling into Fairfield House at Goshen before St Helens. We always suggest to our guest to break their trip up and stay with us for at least 3 to 4 days to take in all that our gorgoeus area has to offer.
Mt Paris Dam wall
This is what Mee Maw B from Brisbane Region, Australia had to say. She was travelling from Launcestion heading to St Helens way. Such a surprise and sooooo unusual This place is so surprising. The turnoff is on the road between Branxholm and Weldborough (less than the half way mark from Branxholm) and then there's a 13km gravel road which is fine for 2WD. You then walk about 100m to the dam wall and OMG it's like something prehistoric. You come upon this huge wall with "doorways" in it. One of them has been knocked through and you can peer through into another world of rocks and ferns. The wall is a discontinued dam and when you walk through you enter another world. It's a photographer's dream and I just couldn't get enough. This is absolutely a must see! Malcolm H from Launceston, Australia had this to say A great piece of history Great piece of local history and a great feat of workmanship . Photographers delight. Travelling east just outside Branxholm take the signposted turn to Mt Paris Dam - 13km . Reset your trip meter to 0 at this point . At almost exactly 13 km there will be a reasonably well used track running downhill to your left . This is the turn - someone has stolen the sign ! If your car is low to the ground walk from here its only about 150 m . Well worth the look . You can continue on the same road through to Welborough and the Tasman Highway ; another 6km. Here at Fairfield house we love this place. My nans brothers helped build the dam and my father used to play on it and even swim in the dam many years ago. Love taking my guest for photograpy tours here and then having a gorgeous lunch at the Weldbourgh Hotel before heading towards Columba Falls, Halls Falls, Big Tree and Blue Teir then calling into Fairfield House at Goshen before St Helens. We always suggest to our guest to break their trip up and stay with us for at least 3 to 4 days to take in all that our gorgoeus area has to offer.
What can I say. Such a gorgeous place and only a 15 minute drive to the top of The Blue Tier from Fairfield House Goshen. So many walks for all types of fitness. The Blue Tier in Tasmania's North East Highlands was an unknown little part of the world until it became the centre of a forestry operations debate. "Friends of the Blue Tier" has been formed to investigate alternatives to clear-fell logging and protect this beautiful area which has wild forests of giant trees, hidden waterfalls and fabulous wildlife, much of it threatened. The mountain plateau they are seeking to protect once had the world s largest open-cut tin mine with miners swarming through the forests, eager to make their fortunes. Now it is a walking destination catering for all levels of experience. Where Is it?: 27 km west of St Helens, off Tasman Highway The Blue Tier Forest Reserve's long history in mining and forestry operations adds interest for visitors. The first Europeans came to this area after some miners who were working in the Mathinna goldfields discovered some rich tin deposits in some of the creeks in this area. The news spread quickly and the area was settled in 1878 as a mining town. Back then the town was made up of a pub, two hotels, a blacksmith, butcher, three stores and a few residential cottages. The level of work varied over the years with the fluctuation of tin prices from things such as the Depression. Chinese miners were also employed here for cheap labour until a policy to employ only white labour in the hard rock mines forced them out. Definately make a day of it especially if you want to inclued the Big Tree Walk and the Stampers and Halls Falls. Great for picnics and if you love bike riding we have world class mtb tracks. Here is a link for more informations so you can make the most of you adventures. For me it is a photographers paradise and love that our family has lots of history here and I offer guided tours to help with local knowledge and also take you to places that only the locals know. http://www.ourtasmania.com.au/launceston/blue-tier.html
Blue Tier
What can I say. Such a gorgeous place and only a 15 minute drive to the top of The Blue Tier from Fairfield House Goshen. So many walks for all types of fitness. The Blue Tier in Tasmania's North East Highlands was an unknown little part of the world until it became the centre of a forestry operations debate. "Friends of the Blue Tier" has been formed to investigate alternatives to clear-fell logging and protect this beautiful area which has wild forests of giant trees, hidden waterfalls and fabulous wildlife, much of it threatened. The mountain plateau they are seeking to protect once had the world s largest open-cut tin mine with miners swarming through the forests, eager to make their fortunes. Now it is a walking destination catering for all levels of experience. Where Is it?: 27 km west of St Helens, off Tasman Highway The Blue Tier Forest Reserve's long history in mining and forestry operations adds interest for visitors. The first Europeans came to this area after some miners who were working in the Mathinna goldfields discovered some rich tin deposits in some of the creeks in this area. The news spread quickly and the area was settled in 1878 as a mining town. Back then the town was made up of a pub, two hotels, a blacksmith, butcher, three stores and a few residential cottages. The level of work varied over the years with the fluctuation of tin prices from things such as the Depression. Chinese miners were also employed here for cheap labour until a policy to employ only white labour in the hard rock mines forced them out. Definately make a day of it especially if you want to inclued the Big Tree Walk and the Stampers and Halls Falls. Great for picnics and if you love bike riding we have world class mtb tracks. Here is a link for more informations so you can make the most of you adventures. For me it is a photographers paradise and love that our family has lots of history here and I offer guided tours to help with local knowledge and also take you to places that only the locals know. http://www.ourtasmania.com.au/launceston/blue-tier.html